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Office 365 Password Expiration Policy

I recently purchased an Office 365 account and wanted to set the Password Expiration policy to never expire.  I understand that is not necessarily a recommend practice but given the particulars of my scenario, it was ok.

The good news is that it only took about 10 minutes for me to make the change. Having said that, I’ve seen several community posts from people who have struggled with this so I thought I would post the steps:

All of the information you need to set the Password Expiration policy to Never Expire can be found in these articles:

 Manage Azure AD using Windows PowerShell

Configure user passwords to never expire

One important step is to ensure you meet the software requirements.  So the first step is to select Review software requirements.  It is important to ensure you have the the correct Microsoft Online Services version.  If you don’t have the right version, you will receive an error when you attempt to install Windows Azure AD Module.  You will need Microsoft Online Services Sign-In Assistant for IT Professionals RTW for the AD Module to work.

One you have Microsoft Online Services Sign-In Assistant for IT Professionals RTW installed and assuming you have a supported Operating System (Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows Server 2008 R2, or Windows Server 2012 with the default version of Microsoft .NET Framework and Windows PowerShell).  You should be able to proceed with the Windows Azure AD Module installation.  You have two options:

  • Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell (32-bit version)
  • Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell (64-bit version)
  •  

    Select the option that matches your machine.  When the install completes, select the option to save a Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows shortcut on your desktop.  This will make it easy to complete the remaining steps. 

    After the install completes, select the Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell application from your desktop to open it.

     

    image

    Next we are going to follow the steps outlined in the article Manage Azure AD using Windows PowerShell

    The first step is connect to your online service.  You have a couple of choices.  Either enter the following command at the prompt:

    connect-msolservice

    Or enter:

    $msolcred = get-credential

    connect-msolservice -credential $msolcred

    For this example, I selected the second option.  You can copy and paste the commands by selecting the Powershell icon from the open program and select edit:

    image

    After entering the command, a credential prompt will open. Here you will enter your Office 365 login credentials and select Ok.

    image

    At this point, you are connected and can run the password policy scripts.  In this example, I am setting the Password Expiration policy for the Office 365 Organization.  If you want to set the policy at the user level, then you can follow those instructions as provided in the article.

    The first script I will run is to set the password expiration policy to Never Expire for all users in the organization.  If you prefer, you can follow the sequence in the article by first checking to see what password expiration policy is set for an individual user or everyone in the organization.  I plan to take that step last because I know what policy is currently set.

    Since I want to set the policy for all users in the organization, I will run the following script:

    Get-MSOLUser | Set-MsolUser -PasswordNeverExpires $true

    image

    Select Enter on your keyboard and the script will complete

    Next I will run the script to check the password policy for all users to ensure it was set as expected:

    Get-MSOLUser | Select UserPrincipalName, PasswordNeverExpires

    After selecting Enter, I can see that the PasswordNeverExpires is set to True for all users as expected:

    O365PowerShell_SC 4.14

    That is all you need to do to set the Online Service account password for your organization to never expire.

    In the event you didn’t notice it in the article, I suggest running the scripts to create a help file and save that to your desktop.  To take that action simply run the following commands and a text file will open that you can save.

    new-item c:\MSOLHelp -type directory get-command | Where-Object {$_.name -like "*msol*"} | format-list | Out-File c:\MSOLHelp\msolcmdlets.txt notepad c:\MSOLHelp\msolcmdlets.txt

     

    image

    Have fun exploring the other things you can do with PowerShell scripts & Office 365.

    Cheers

    Update Rollups – Should I or Should I Not, that is the Question

    March 24, 2014 3 comments

    With the recent release of CRM 2013 Update Rollup 2 aka UR 2, I thought this might be a good time to share what I’ve learned over the years from my experience and the experience of others regarding the deployment of Update Rollups to production.

    Here are a few guiding principles that should help to ensure a more smooth rollout of Update Rollups.

    Sometimes there can be unexpected issues related to the UR that could break something that is working.  Yes, it does sometimes happen even when the most rigorous regression testing is applied.  Following the tips below should help to ensure you do not experience an unexpected issue.

    Read, um read & read one more time.  Update Rollups include fixes to issues.  Also, listen to the Microsoft Dynamics CRM Podcast that the Premier Field Engineer team does for each UR.   If you are not experiencing issues that are addressed, it is ok to skip a UR or two.  Keep in mind, sometimes there are hidden gems in the UR, like performance enhancements, so take your time when reading through the list and making your decision.

    Turn off automatic updates to the CRM servers.  You’ll want to devise a methodical and tested approach to applying updates to servers.  A methodical approach should include always applying the Update Rollup to a development environment first and ensure end users have fully tested the UR prior to deploying to production.  I recommend creating a test plan that includes a list of test scripts that users are required to run on the test environment.  You should have a ‘base’ list of test scripts to work from and update the list based on the information you glean from the UR.  Add scripts that will test the components referenced in the UR.

    Understand that Client side update rollups will automatically be delivered through the Windows Update Service in a week or two after the UR release data.  Therefore, be sure to include tests to the Outlook Client in your scenario.  If you do happen to run across a breaking issue, you can temporarily turn off Windows Updates to the client machines until the issue is addressed.

    Taking some time up front to apply a methodical approach to testing Update Rollups could save you some time and frustration if or when something unexpected happens. You can work with a cross functional team made up of IT and CRM end users to create your testing process to included test scripts.  Once you’ve done a couple of these, it will become quite easy.

    Be sure to check out the CRM 2013 UR 2 Podcast

    Cheers

    Set yourself up for success. Understand

    Set yourself up for success. Understand the key roles needed for a successful #MSDynCRM project http://www.crmsoftwareblog.com/2014/03/key-customer-roles-needed-for-a-successful-dynamics-crm-implementation-project/ @MSDynamicsCRM

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